Pre-K – CA Common Core – Standards & Learning Objectives

PK.NO Number Sense

 

PK.1.0 Children expand their understanding of numbers and quantities in their everyday environment.

 

PK.1.1 Recite numbers in order to twenty with increasing accuracy.

Count dots (up to 20) (Pre-K – E.1)

Count shapes (up to 20) (Pre-K – E.2)

Count objects (up to 20) (Pre-K – E.3)

 

PK.1.2 Recognize and know the name of some written numerals.

Represent numbers (up to 10) (Pre-K – D.7)

Represent numbers (up to 20) (Pre-K – E.6)

 

PK.1.3 Identify, without counting, the number of objects in a collection of up to four objects (i.e., subitize).

Count dots (up to 3) (Pre-K – B.1)

Count shapes (up to 3) (Pre-K – B.2)

Count objects (up to 3) (Pre-K – B.3)

Represent numbers (up to 3) (Pre-K – B.7)

Count dots (up to 5) (Pre-K – C.1)

Count shapes (up to 5) (Pre-K – C.2)

Count objects (up to 5) (Pre-K – C.3)

Represent numbers (up to 5) (Pre-K – C.7)

 

PK.1.4 Count up to ten objects, using one-to-one correspondence (one object for each number word) with increasing accuracy.

Count dots (up to 10) (Pre-K – D.1)

Count shapes (up to 10) (Pre-K – D.2)

Count objects (up to 10) (Pre-K – D.3)

 

PK.1.5 Understand, when counting, that the number name of the last object counted represents the total number of objects in the group (i.e., cardinality).

Represent numbers (up to 10) (Pre-K – D.7)

Represent numbers (up to 20) (Pre-K – E.6)

 

PK.2.0 Children expand their understanding of number relationships and operations in their everyday environment.

 

PK.2.1 Compare, by counting or matching, two groups of up to five objects and communicate, “more,” “same as,” or “fewer” (or “less”).

More (Pre-K – F.2)

Compare in a chart (fewer or more) (Pre-K – F.4)

Compare in a mixed group (Pre-K – F.5)

 

PK.2.2 Understand that adding one or taking away one changes the number in a small group of objects by exactly one.

Count up and down – with pictures (Kindergarten – C.10)

 

PK.2.3 Understand that putting two groups of objects together will make a bigger group and that a group of objects can be taken apart into smaller groups.

Addition with pictures – sums up to 5 (Kindergarten – I.1)

 

PK.2.4 Solve simple addition and subtraction problems with a small number of objects (sums up to 10), usually by counting.

Addition with pictures – sums up to 10 (Kindergarten – I.6)

Subtract with pictures – numbers up to 10 (Kindergarten – J.5)

PK.AF Algebra and Functions (Classification and Patterning)

 

PK.1.0 Children expand their understanding of sorting and classifying objects in their everyday environment.

 

PK.1.1 Sort and classify objects by one or more attributes, into two or more groups, with increasing accuracy (e.g., may sort first by one attribute and then by another attribute).

Same (Pre-K – H.1)

Different (Pre-K – H.2)

Same and different (Pre-K – H.3)

Classify by color (Pre-K – H.4)

 

PK.2.0 Children expand their understanding of simple, repeating patterns.

 

PK.2.1 Recognize and duplicate simple repeating patterns.

Similar patterns (Kindergarten – H.1)

Complete missing parts of patterns (Kindergarten – H.2)

 

PK.2.2 Begin to extend and create simple repeating patterns.

Similar patterns (Kindergarten – H.1)

Complete missing parts of patterns (Kindergarten – H.2)

PK.MEA Measurement

 

PK.1.0 Children expand their understanding of comparing, ordering, and measuring objects.

 

PK.1.1 Compare two objects by length, weight, or capacity directly (e.g., putting objects side by side) or indirectly (e.g., using a third object).

Long and short (Pre-K – I.1)

Tall and short (Pre-K – I.2)

Light and heavy (Pre-K – I.3)

Holds more or less (Pre-K – I.4)

Compare height, weight, and capacity (Pre-K – I.5)

Wide and narrow (Pre-K – I.6)

 

PK.1.2 Order four or more objects by size.

Long and short (Pre-K – I.1)

Tall and short (Pre-K – I.2)

Light and heavy (Pre-K – I.3)

Holds more or less (Pre-K – I.4)

Compare height, weight, and capacity (Pre-K – I.5)

Wide and narrow (Pre-K – I.6)

 

PK.1.3 Measure length using multiple duplicates of the same-size concrete units laid end to end.

PK.G Geometry

 

PK.1.0 Children identify and use a variety of shapes in their everyday environment.

 

PK.1.1 Identify, describe, and construct a variety of different shapes, including variations of a circle, triangle, rectangle, square, and other shapes.

Identify circles, squares, and triangles (Pre-K – A.1)

Identify squares and rectangles (Pre-K – A.2)

Identify cubes and pyramids (Pre-K – A.3)

 

PK.1.2 Combine different shapes to create a picture or design.

 

PK.2.0 Children expand their understanding of positions in space.

 

PK.2.1 Identify positions of objects and people in space, including in/on/ under, up/down, inside/outside, beside/between, and in front/behind.

Inside and outside (Pre-K – G.1)

Above and below (Pre-K – G.2)

Left and right (Pre-K – G.3)

Left, middle, and right (Pre-K – G.4)

Top and bottom (Pre-K – G.5)

PK.MR Mathematical Reasoning

 

PK.1.0 Children expand the use of mathematical thinking to solve problems that arise in their everyday environment.

 

PK.1.1 Identify and apply a variety of mathematical strategies to solve problems in their environment.

Compare in a mixed group (Pre-K – F.5)

Same and different (Pre-K – H.3)

What is “math anxiety”? Can it be overcome?

Yes, math anxiety can be overcome. But it is often not a simple “quick fix”.  And “catch-up lesson practice” means extra time and effort.

With math anxiety students get repeatedly lost in understanding new (or prior) concepts, don’t remember their use of skills once “learned” and then become frustrated by repeatedly encountering situations of “never getting it”.

This high frustration sadly often leads to resignation and then failure to remedy it.  As a result students forego future academic options leading to lucrative careers. Difficulties in math studies are often due to accepting myths on effective learning and the inability to get “quick fixes”,

Math anxiety arises when lessons are not really mastered, when they are not properly integrated with prior knowledge or when there isn’t sufficient review and/or re-learning for long term retention. Prevention of math anxiety thus requires ensuring that current lessons are really understood, that there is integration with prior knowledge and that there is sufficient review and reteaching for long term retention.

To overcome math anxiety students need to “catch-up”: to acknowledge the need to ask for help; to learn sound study habits; and then, devote needed time and effort to relearn (and then reinforce) lessons through EXTRA specially-guided daily math practice.

To overcome math anxiety we design personalized lessons that:

Diagnose for gaps in understanding and missing skills

Teach sound study habits

Identify & reduce student anxiety in specific areas

Determine comfortable starting points for relearning and review

Reteach lessons for understanding

Increase self-confidence by doing simple tasks very well.

We encourage and support students in making these small but sure daily progress during catch-up.  The goal at every step always is correct understanding, fluency in applying skills and increasing confidence in needed recall.

One website that helps with practicing  grade-specific skills (and reporting progress in practice) is at www.ixl.com.  Many of our lesson materials are keyed to practicing these skills – once  associated with appropriate math curriculum standards.